Photos

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Beneficial habitats and tree species

Riparian areas are valuable habitats for many water birds and songbirds.
Photo by Sandrine Biziaux Scherson Photography

Watch for birds carrying nesting material in spring.
Photo by Tom Grey

Egrets, herons are colony nesters and often nest high off the ground near fresh or brackish water
Photo by Tom Grey

American Kestrel is a falcon that sometimes nests in palms.
Photo by Tom Eastman

Oriole nest
Photo by Sims Tree Care

Several species, including orioles, nest behind fronds.
Photo by Tom Grey

Nuttall’s Woodpeckers nest in palms and dead trees.
Photo by Tom Eastman

Palms provide fruit for many birds.
Photo by Dan Grafton

Silk oaks also provide fruit for birds.
Photo by Sandrine Biziaux Scherson Photography

Eucayptus groves may be nesting locations for hawks, hummingbirds, crows and others

  • Hawk in flight

    Look near tree for parent birds with prey.
    Photo by Peggy Honda

  • White-tailed kites may nest in bottle brush.
    Photo by Sandrine Biziaux Scherson Photography

  • Bottle brush provides nectar for birds and insects.
    Photo by Sandrine Biziaux Scherson Photography

young birds feeding

Birds just out of the nest are still dependent on parents.
Photo by Peggy Honda

Dead trees and dead limbs

  • Trees with large cavities are necessary for large cavity-nesting birds

    Trees with large cavities are necessary for large cavity-nesting birds.
    Photo by Susan Merrill

  • Woodpecker nesting cavities may be in obscure locations in dying trees

    Woodpecker nesting cavities may be in obscure locations in dying trees.
    Photo by Peggy Honda

Nesting cavities are created on underside of limbs and often fought over.
Photo by Sandrine Biziaux Scherson Photography

Natural hollows in trees become nesting sites.
Photo by Peggy Honda

Only when necessary, active nest boxes should be relocated close by in the same tree.
Photo by Peggy Honda

Nests that are hard to spot

Kildeer make simple scrape nests.
Photo by Bogomaz

Burrowing owls nest in abandoned mammal burrows.
Photo by Sandrine Biziaux Scherson Photography

Hummingbird in nest

Hummingbird nests are about 2″ in diameter
Photo by Peggy Honda

Cactus wrens sometimes nest in prickly pear.
Photo by Sandrine Biziaux Scherson Photography

Long-eared owls roost in trees with dense foliage in winter.
Photo by Sandrine Biziaux Scherson Photography

Even large stick nests can be hidden by foliage.
Photo by Sandrine Biziaux Scherson Photography

Bird species that warrant special management

California gnatcatchers nest low off the ground in chapparal and coastal sage scrub.
Photo by Sandrine Biziaux Scherson Photography

Cactus wren nest in cholla and prickly pear.
Photo by Sandrine Biziaux Scherson Photography

Burrowing owls nest and overwinter in animal burrows.
Photo by Sandrine Biziaux Scherson Photography

Mammals and other species that use trees

Bobcats seek safety and prey in trees.
Photo by Harold Moore

Red fox and small mammals use cavities at the base of trees and in downed wood.
Photo by Debbie Steinhausser

Western gray squirrels den in hollow trees and make stick nests in branches.
Photo by Sandrine Biziaux Scherson Photography

Raccoons sleep and hide in tree hollows.
Photo by Debbie Steinhausser

Chipmunks seek food in trees and some also build nests in trees.
Photo by Sandrine Biziaux Scherson Photography
 

Insects such as bees nest in vacant tree enclosures.
Photo by Sandrine Biziaux Scherson Photography